Author Archives: Kim Brooks

How to Create Innovation in Government

Post Image

Innovation in government doesn’t have to be radical — it just means producing better results with better tools. Sometimes innovation happens in leaps and bounds, sometimes it happens incrementally. Innovation can mean new technology, but it can also mean a change in processes, leadership and culture. So how can government agencies create a culture that […]

Continue Reading...

What Does It Take to Make a Great Team?

Post Image

Google is one of the most successful companies in history.  It got there in part by optimizing its personnel and how they work together to innovate and be efficient. But even Google wasn’t sure what makes a team great.  They finally engaged a researcher with Harvard and Yale credentials to research what made some teams […]

Continue Reading...

Improving Government Performance is a Culture Change

Post Image

Many government leaders want to see their organizations change and improve, and start by committing to the latest technology or new management system. But real change towards improving government performance starts with a culture shift. Technology is often seen as a panacea to system problems. It has features that are easily described, a defined price tag, […]

Continue Reading...

A Scorecard for Public Engagement

Post Image

Engaging citizens with policy-making is critical to creating projects that the public understands and supports. This kind of civic engagement is important from the idea stage through implementation.  City and county managers already know the value of public engagement  – public support can make or break a project. Now the Davenport Institute for Public Engagement and Civic […]

Continue Reading...

Mukilteo Lights the Way to Lean Operations

When the City of Mukilteo was faced with dwindling revenues, Mayor Joe Marine challenged city staff to be creative, to do more with less, and to find ways to increase efficiency of operations. Chief among the city’s challenges were the loss of staff resources and institutional knowledge, badly outdated technology infrastructure and a growing need […]

Continue Reading...